What It All Means

If you get nothing else from this month, I want you to become more comfortable with being a writer. I want you to be able to look at screens, or blank pages and let what is in you flow out.

I want you to be comfortable with people calling you a writer as well. Be comfortable with people asking you to create. Be okay with people inviting you to creative spaces. You are being asked to these places because people believe in your talent–and what you have to say.

The question really is, do you believe what you have to say?

If you believe, then write. If you don’t believe, write anyway. Sometimes, just sometimes, inspiration doesn’t come. It has to be conjured.

Writers’ Self-Doubt- Part 1

Image result for writers self doubt

You are never so open as when you are being creative.

There is something of a more wily  enemy writers fear or confront aside from writer’s block. It is the monster of self-doubt. There is a source one accesses, even taps into, when you take the idea you are rolling around your head and convert all those thoughts to a document for someone else to read. In this area where you are most powerful, you are exponentially more vulnerable. Here is where the war begins.

You must get what is in your head–out. This is all writing is, boiled down to base component. All the words you know, all the words you were taught, all the dialects and experiences–writing allows you to get all these things from head to hand.

Self-doubt as a writer is the roommate that doesn’t pay rent, wrecks parties, and says inappropriate things in front of your friends. Self-doubt is the bastard son of all creativity.  And the more you feed it, the larger it gets–an the more unmanageable it becomes.

Self-doubt is a permanent roommate for every writer or creative person. As soon as you accept this, and realize this, the faster you can put your earplugs in when they play loud music late at night.

The easiest why to shut up self-doubt is to do the very thing you are afraid to do:  write. Write scared. Write when you’re frustrated. Write when you’re mad. Write when you’re happy. But write.

The more you write, the faster self-doubt loses weight, the quieter its voice gets, and the doubt is replaced by confidence.

That self-doubt may never go away, but you can always shut it up.

 

Jennifer P. Harris

Founder, Shekinah Glory Writing Services