Take All The Time You Need

Writing is a process.

Writing is a journey.

No writing journey is, should be, is a planned to be linear! Time is relative in the life of a writer. It, too, is a tool. It needs to be something you do because you love to do it, or because you have a plethora of things to say! Either way, you are writing BECAUSE you have something to say.

Self-rejection as an artist can be cyclic, triggered by situations and our own mental health! Recognizing what contributes to your writing journey (or lack of one), is imperative to your success as a writer! This journey will be demanding. It will be challenging. It will be rewarding and satisfying as you take the time to cultivate it!

Be gentle with yourself.

Be accountable to yourself.

Remember you write for yourself first. Don’t deprive you, of YOU.

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Banishing Scriptophobia & Graphophobia

Note: These are real psychological conditions and they need to be treated with respect. With that said, fear is a source of self-rejection. So, let us examine this. -JBHarris

Scriptophobia: fear of writing in public

Graphophobia: fear of writing (or even thinking of writing)

Fear is the root of self-rejection as it relates to writing! Fear is a liar, a gossip, a mocking bird, and a hole in the bottom of any ship! It is the enemy of imagination. Let me say it again:

FEAR IS THE ENEMY OF IMAGINATION!

When confronting these serious circumstances, let me say these four things—

Fear is natural, not normal. There are some things about writing that are frightening. But most of this fear comes from what other people may think about your work! The red pens, the Omnipotent No and the rejection of manuscripts. Fear of rejection comes with the territory of writing. Yet, you must bear in mind this one thing, “I have the ability to write whatever I want, and I have the freedom to write whatever I want.”

Make this your mantra. It will save your sanity!

See what scares you. The thing that keeps your from writing, has to be seen in order to be confronted. The most important question you must ask yourself is, “What is scaring me about this work?” I cannot emphasize this enough! Aside from asking yourself, “What am I going to write about?” You have to ask yourself if there is something relating to this work–or a future work–that could cause you to be scared to write it. Here, right here, is where writers get and become stuck. If you cannot confront what is scaring you, if you will not confront what is stopping you, you will ever write.

Think about this! Do you want to be in such a blockage that you cannot create anything else…because you don’t believe you can!

See the problem, dear ones. Stop running from it.

*Note: Trauma is a real thing, and anxiety is real. Know that help is available, and you are entitled to ask for what you need. Artists sometimes are the people whom need to confront what bothers them, what hurts them in order to write as they need. Don’t release the gift without a fight!

Schedule, prep time and relaxing. When confronting this level of fear and apprehension, getting a routine together to write/create is comforting. Even if that is 5 minutes to think about what you want to write. In that time, take 5 deep breaths–thinking on what you want to write about. Focus your energy on being relaxed enough to imagine. From that, try and write for five minutes. Consider this akin to learning to walk again. You have to give yourself time. Be gentle with yourself. Take it one step at a time.

Slay the dragons. Write. You have to write through the fear! You MUST write through the fear. Remember, the first person you write for is yourself! The first person who is your first fan of your work is YOU! The rest of the world will come–if you want.

Tip: Try keeping a journal. Don’t commit to a word count or page count. Just write. Whatever it is, whatever you feel. Just write it down.

This is a start, my Oracles. Take this tricks. Take these tools and slay your dragons. I know you can.

The Art Of [Not] Self-Rejecting

Self-rejection: The process of writers completing a work and not believing their work to submit or publish in any medium; they don’t think it’s good enough.

The process for writers to develop self-confidence is on-going! Rejection is part the process, especially if you desire to publish work in a public medium.

Writing requires radical belief in self, and the developing a thick skin. Not everything you create. So, let me give you three things which will remind you to keep writing, and self-rejection is never going to be something of any use to you:

  1. You are the writer. You control the pace, tempo and content of the work. The decision to write, the decision to publish, the decision to pursue writing as a career or hobby is totally up to you! If you don’t believe you can, then you never will.

2. Know your lane. You must know the type of stories you want to write. You must be confident in what you want to share with the world, and know you have something to say! No matter the genre, the troupes mentioned, never think something ‘has been done to death’! It hasn’t been done by you. Since it hasn’t been done by you! Keep that same energy! You’ll need it.

3. Create. Share. Repeat. Sometimes getting some trusted people to read your work is a confidence builder! Another thing to be mindful of is the rich nature of writer groups on social media! Writers do well in community, despite the solo nature of our work. Brainstorm on the community posts, engage with other writers, and those dusty WIP’s share them people whom will be honest with you! In order for you to develop the stamina to deal with rejection (again, this comes with the territory), you have to become used to people reading your work and commenting on it. Good or bad. But the goal being at this step is to get used to writing, critique and feedback.

Self-rejection can be a mill stone around your creativity. It hinders and stymies. No one needs that as a writer. The people in your head need to be let out. Don’t make it harder them.

You can do it! Keep writing!