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Use What You Have On Hand

The free writes, the stray and floating ideas–what do you have on hand?

On Season 1 of The Writers’ Block Podcast, I talked about the this concept. I talked about how we, as writers, don’t truly know the wealth that we have! In understanding that wealth you have, you created, you may have to create something that I call, the draft-drawer.

The draft-drawer is a place where you put all the work you haven’t gotten to yet, aren’t sure where to go next, or things you got stuck on. This could even be snippets of plots, titles, or even snippets of conversation you jot! Your draft-drawer is a both a well and wealth of information!

With the new year, new decade at slow hum, don’t think that you need to recreate the wheel! That can be stressful for a writer, trust me. But you need to know is the new, potent, powerful work may just be hidden in a file. It may be incomplete. It may be in the transition from the thoughts in your head to the words and worlds on the page.

The work is there. The work has always been there. It’s your job to either find it, complete it, or find more of it.

Be brave. The world is waiting.

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When You Push Your Wishes, They Become Words

“I wish I could write.”

I cannot tell you how often I have heard this from clients and other writing friends. But I tell them the same thing I will tell you:

“Write anyway. Wishing won’t make words.”

When you make the time to write–when you fight for it in some cases–you will be amazed as to what happens in that space. When you push your wish, you can make words.”

Push the wish, you push the words.

My wish for you, as this year ends, is to push the wishes. Rage against the excuses and time constraints. I want you to stop giving yourself the out of saying “I wish I had time to write.”

Push your wishes into reality!

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Writing Means You Hope To Master Language

Can I be honest with you?

Writing is some of the hardest work I have ever had to do. Due to the desire I have for expression, language and words, I keep at it. I bend words, I learn new words, and I have the insane desire to show other people what I can do with those words.

Being a writer means, I hope to master language. I hope to push through doubts and darker thoughts to do what I love to do. Even when I don’t love to do it! This is the hope that I have for you.

I want you to have the boldness to look at a blank page and give a piece of your heart to it. I want you to be brave enough to record accents, portions of story and portions of life to the work. It is important that you know and remember this craft is a process. It is a craft. It is one of the most amazing things you can possibly do–if you are willing.

As you push towards the end of the year, remember to be gentle with yourself. Generous with your words, and remember their are 24 hours in a day. You can do it–if you desire to do.

I believe you can! Go get, dear one.

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Pulling Up The Weeds: Get Rid Of Fear With These Steps.

FEAR: False Evidence Appearing Real.

This acronym is something which I think applies to writers. Moreover, this acronym can be constructed this way as well.

FEAR: False Energy Against Reality.

For writers, with writing, FEAR in both forms are eventual enemies of any creative person. However, there are three ways to combat these.

1.) Writing schedule. There is a portion of work, of writing work, which is demanding. It is rigorous. It is disciplined. When the Grand Dame Octavia Butler said, sometimes as a writer, you would rather clean toilets than write (this is true, but I digress). But having a set time, a schedule, will help you organize your thoughts and help you through the tough times of your works in progress.

*Note: I know life is hard, and scheduled time to write can be a dream. But you, as the writer, you have to make time. Even if it’s ten minutes a day. Or for that week. At least write the idea down, don’t lose it!

YOU MAY NOT GET IT BACK!

2.) Frequent reading. Writers are readers. It is in the pace and peace of reading that can prepare you to write. Or to continue to write. Reading allows the mind freedom to wander, to know, to question. Reading gives connections, fuels imagination and allows growth and space to write–in another voice, vantage point or genre.

If you can’t write, read.

3.) Step away from the work when needed. Sometimes the writing is hard. Sometimes the words don’t come, or come as you want. But what I want you to know if that if you need to walk away from the work, you can. You should. Sometimes, the best thing to do is to take a break and regroup!

The regrouping can be a quick as a walk outside, a drive around your block or a binging on your streaming service of choice. Having your mind occupying another space or place, can relax you–even help you to examine what hang up you have about what you’re working on. Never dismiss the rest you need as a writer. It doesn’t deter from your talent to rest.

Writing is like traveling through a forest. There is a trail, and you must find it. The great thing is, the comforting thing is, as a writer you can make one. Or another. You are never trapped.