The Art Of [Not] Self-Rejecting

Self-rejection: The process of writers completing a work and not believing their work to submit or publish in any medium; they don’t think it’s good enough.

The process for writers to develop self-confidence is on-going! Rejection is part the process, especially if you desire to publish work in a public medium.

Writing requires radical belief in self, and the developing a thick skin. Not everything you create. So, let me give you three things which will remind you to keep writing, and self-rejection is never going to be something of any use to you:

  1. You are the writer. You control the pace, tempo and content of the work. The decision to write, the decision to publish, the decision to pursue writing as a career or hobby is totally up to you! If you don’t believe you can, then you never will.

2. Know your lane. You must know the type of stories you want to write. You must be confident in what you want to share with the world, and know you have something to say! No matter the genre, the troupes mentioned, never think something ‘has been done to death’! It hasn’t been done by you. Since it hasn’t been done by you! Keep that same energy! You’ll need it.

3. Create. Share. Repeat. Sometimes getting some trusted people to read your work is a confidence builder! Another thing to be mindful of is the rich nature of writer groups on social media! Writers do well in community, despite the solo nature of our work. Brainstorm on the community posts, engage with other writers, and those dusty WIP’s share them people whom will be honest with you! In order for you to develop the stamina to deal with rejection (again, this comes with the territory), you have to become used to people reading your work and commenting on it. Good or bad. But the goal being at this step is to get used to writing, critique and feedback.

Self-rejection can be a mill stone around your creativity. It hinders and stymies. No one needs that as a writer. The people in your head need to be let out. Don’t make it harder them.

You can do it! Keep writing!

Encouragement Pages-05/25/2020

I want you to believe in your imagination. I want you to consider your imagination something which needs be cultivated as often as possible.

Make time to daydream.

Make time to wonder.

Make time to wander.

Your imagination will thank you the next time you demand it key on to create. Athletes work everyday to prepare for compeitions. Keep that same energy to write.

With Love & Ink,

JBHarris

The Map In Your Own Head

This week will make a reference to The Writers’ Block Podcast: the episode name is “The Power Of The Draft Drawer.”

There is a magic to revisiting what you have created. There are some of us whom do this work, practice this craft, know that not everything can be written, and not everything can be seen either. But you have to know that what you have on you head–it will eventually find its way out of it.

There is this concept of a draft-drawer I heard Anne Rice speak about during one of her Facebook Live sessions. She said that she doesn’t toss work away–she saves it! She saves it because it may be needed for something else.

It may be backstory for something else; the original idea can be reworked (Christopher Rice said he remembered the novel we know as The Witching Hour being a totally different permutation before the finished work); the work can be used to be a subplot–but nothing needs to be thrown away! The map to the work you need to write–is in your hands.

The drafts are maps! No good explorer or adventurer throws away their map! Writing is one of those careers where mapping, where recording is one of the ways by which the work is completed. And the work must be completed!

Do not be afraid of the work ahead, Oracles. Do not be afraid of what you must do, must get out of you, and what you are excited about! Writing is hard enough! There are some work you will do which will require a map–don’t sell yourself short.

Value your map. Keep the maps. Do your work.

Encouragement Pages 05/18/2020

Find your pens.

Toni Morrison said that writers do their best work in the dark. And indeed, the times we are in now, are increasingly devoid of light. Do not despair! You are a writer! You have the light.

You are light.

Thought paper, screen and voice you have the power and capacity to record, confront and rewrite! You mustn’t lose hope… you are the hope.

Find your pens.

With Love & Ink,

JBHarris